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TERRY - HAPLOGROUP  G - LINEAGE I - Discussion

Haplogroup G2a

(This is of course a work in progress)

Individuals in this group who have DNA tested as of  June 10, 2010: R-1, T-22, T-35, T-44, T-68 T-80

These individuals who have tested are linked to John Terry born about 1740 in New Jersey. The persons in this group are distinct in that their haplogroup G2 is rare among Europeans. From this information alone you can definitely say they are not related to the Southside Virginia Terry men in Haplogroup I - Lineage I in the study [haplogroup I1b] nor the northern branches of Terry men out of early Long Island, New York even though they have only tested 12 markers. Since we have very close genetic distance in this group between documented brothers this confirms the modal values for this group.

There is quite a bit on several family members by the late Robert Ward Terry (1813 - 1987) who was a frequent contributor to Terry Family Historian quarterly (1982-1988) which is now on line. You can find his articles by searching for "Covering the Terry-Tory" with the quotes in the search box on the TFH homepage

There is a link at RootsWeb which is particularly enlightening indicating John and Ruth Terry were of the Dividing Creek Baptist Church, Cumberland County, New Jersey --  Note regarding John and Ansel Terry and Dividing Creek Church There are records I believe to substantiate several of the relationships listed below although I do not have a list of them. If any family members have deed, will or marriage citations I would appreciate hearing from you so we can post the information. See also Bryce Henderson Stevens page on Terry Family  .

So early descendants of this Terry family can be found in New Jersey, Ohio, Kentucky, Missouri and Indiana.

 

 

In comparing 37 markers, the probability that T-22, T-35 and T-44 shared a common ancestor within the last....
4 generations 8 generations 12 generations 16 generations 20 generations 24 generations
58.88% 88.97% 97.45% 99.45% 99.89% 99.98%

*The above numbers are based exclusively on the comparison of their Y-DNA results, which show no mismatches. I believe a generation is considered to be 25 years.

 

In comparing 67 markers, the probability that  T-22  and T-44 shared a common ancestor within the last....
4 generations 8 generations 12 generations 16 generations 20 generations 24 generations
71.54% 95.15% 99.3% 99.91% 99.99% 100%

*The above numbers are based exclusively on the comparison of their Y-DNA results, which show no mismatches. I believe a generation is considered to be 25 years.

The most recent common ancestor for T-22 and T-44 is Robert Jackson Terry b. 10 Apr 1832 Franklin Co.,IN, d. 9 Dec 1897 Jameson, MO, m.#1 Mary C Hammons, #2 Susan M Hammons. 

T-44 had a mutation somewhere after Robert Jackson TERRY. I have spoken to the president of familytreedna.com and he stated that he is a one mutation difference from his brother. You never know where a mutation will happen. It is interesting that T-22 is genetically closer to a more distant connection, T-35. - Sharol Terry Pestotnik in an email to Mike Terry on 30 Sep 2007.

In comparing 67 markers, the probability that  T-35  and T-44 shared a common ancestor within the last....
4 generations 8 generations 12 generations 16 generations 20 generations 24 generations
71.54% 95.15% 99.3% 99.91% 99.99% 100%

*The above numbers are based exclusively on the comparison of their Y-DNA results, which show no mismatches. I believe a generation is considered to be 25 years.

The most recent common ancestor for these two persons who tested is John Terry who died about 1795 in Cincinnati, Ohio who originated from the state of New Jersey. T-35 and T-22 are a genetic distance of 1. This indicates they are "Tightly Related", both with traditional genealogy and genetic DNA tests. 

 

In comparing 67 markers, the probability that  T-35  and T-22 shared a common ancestor within the last....
4 generations 8 generations 12 generations 16 generations 20 generations 24 generations
89.79% 98.96% 99.89% 99.99% 100% 100%

*The above numbers are based exclusively on the comparison of their Y-DNA results, which show no mismatches. I believe a generation is considered to be 25 years.

The most recent common ancestor for all three persons who tested is John Terry who died about 1795 in Cincinnati, Ohio who originated from the state of New Jersey. T-35 and T-22 are a genetic distance of 0. This indicates they are "Very Tightly Related", both with traditional genealogy and genetic DNA tests. This is the first 100 percent match we have had on 67 markers in the Terry DNA Project. These two tests combined are the modal values for the common ancestor in Group 5.


The FTDNATiP results are based on the mutation rate study presented during the 1st International Conference on Genetic Genealogy, on Oct. 30, 2004. The above probabilities take into consideration the mutation rates for each individual marker being compared.